Quotes

“Let us keep reminding each other to breathe, to smile, to treat ourselves and one another with kindness. Let us hold each other when we need support, and let us challenge and remind each other of what is truly important. Let us take care of ourselves so that we don’t hand down our unfinished business to the next generation. Let us laugh together, and never lose our joy. . . . And let us take care of the children—our children, all the children. Let us mobilize our fierce and passionate mother energy on behalf of all beings on this little blue-green planet we call Mother Earth.” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“Mindful parenting is a continual process of deepening and refining our awareness and our ability to be present and act wisely. It is not an attempt to attain a fixed goal or outcome, however worthy. An important part of this process is seeing ourselves with some degree of kindness and compassion. This includes seeing and accepting our limitation, our blindnesses, our humanness and fallibility, and working with them mindfully as best we can.” Jon and Myla Kabat-Zinn, Everyday Blessings: The Inner Work of Mindful Parenting


“I must try to be alone for part of each year . . . and part of each day . . . in order to keep my core, my center . . . Women must be still as the axis of a wheel in the midst of her activities . . . She must be the pioneer of achieving this stillness, not only for her own salvation, but for the salvation of family life, of society, perhaps even of our civilization.” Anne Morrow Lindbergh, Gift From the Sea


“We must break the cultural habit of sacrificing our inner lives for our outer lives, of giving up depth in deference to speed.” Abby Seixas, Finding the Deep River Within: A Woman’s Guide to Recovering Balance & Meaning in Everyday Life


“Mothering is a vocation that stretches us and that helps us find that which is most wise and loving and generous within us. Day by day, we deepen our practice of Momfulness [conscious mothering] by being more present, attentive, compassionate, embodied, in touch with the sacred, and committed to community. As we open to the immense and maternal love at the heart of the universe, we discover that all of life becomes a meditation that transforms us, our families, and our world.” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“It is particularly important that we women learn to draw on our inner resources of wisdom and compassion because women have a critical role to play in making the world a better place for ourselves and for future generations . . . While both women’s and men’s roles are shifting, women are still by and large the primary guides and caretakers of the next generation- at home, at school, at day care. As such, what we model in these roles matters. We are well positioned as nurturers and teachers to guide our children toward thinking, feeling, and listening more deeply.” Abby Seixas, Finding the Deep River Within: A Woman’s Guide to Recovering Balance & Meaning in Everyday Life


“Parenting is one of the most challenging, demanding, and stressful jobs on the planet. It is also one of the most important, for how it is done influences in great measure the heart and soul and consciousness of the next generation, their experience of meaning and connection, their repertoire of life skills, and their deepest feelings about themselves and their possible place in a rapidly changing world.” Jon and Myla Kabat-Zinn, Everyday Blessings: The Inner Work of Mindful Parenting


“By attending to our deepest selves day to day, we not only receive nourishment but also plant the seeds of a much-needed alternative to prevailing cultural norms. May our inner work be a blessing, and may it help to bring about a more life-giving, just, and peaceful world for ourselves and one another, for our children, for our planet, for our future.” Abby Seixas, Finding the Deep River Within: A Woman’s Guide to Recovering Balance & Meaning in Everyday Life


“… the practice is always the same: To be fully present, looking deeply, as best we can, and without judging or condemning events or our experience of them. Just presence, and appropriate action, moment by moment. It can be anchored by a daily formal practice at a convenient time, but the major commitment will of necessity be the cultivation of mindfulness in everyday life, responding to the call of parenting, allowing each day and each moment to provide the arena for a deepening of awareness.” Jon and Myla Kabat-Zinn, Everyday Blessings: The Inner Work of Mindful Parenting


“Mindful parenting is the hardest job on the planet, but it’s also one that has the potential for the deepest kinds of satisfactions over the life span, and the greatest feelings of interconnectedness and community and belonging.” Jon Kabat-Zinn in an interview with YES! Magazine


“Momfulness is the word I use for this spiritual practice of conscious mothering. When we mother with mindfulness and compassion and a willingness to let this vocation awaken our hearts and transform our lives, we walk a spiritual path. We discover that care for our children and family is not a distraction from sacred practice but is the very essence of it.” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“Parenting is a mirror in which we get to see the best of ourselves, and the worst; the richest moments of living, and the most frightening.” Jon and Myla Kabat-Zinn, Everyday Blessings: The Inner Work of Mindful Parenting


“You have to find a mother inside yourself. We all do. Even if we already have a mother, we still have to find this part of ourselves inside.” Sue Monk Kidd, The Secret Life of Bees


“Breathing in, I calm my body. Breathing out, I smile. Dwelling in the present moment, I know this is a wonderful moment.” Thich Nhat Hanh


“If you want the truth, I will tell you the truth: Friend, listen: the God whom I love is inside.” Robert Bly, The Kabir Book


“Self-care is never a selfish act- it is simply good stewardship of the only gift I have, the gift I was put on earth to offer to others. Anytime we can listen to the true self and give it the care it requires, we do so not only for ourselves but for the many other whose lives we touch.” Parker Palmer, Let your Life Speak


“Everybody today seems to be in such a terrible rush, anxious for greater developments and greater riches and so on, so that children have very little time for their parents. Parents have very little time for each other, and in the home begins the disruption of the peace of the world.” Attributed to Mother Theresa


“We can proceed according to the planned itinerary, strenuously trying to make life conform to our needs, or we can adapt to whatever we meet and flow without effort.” Piero Ferrucci, What Our Children Teach Us


“My trouble is that I think there is a track things should stay on. I’m hooked to a belief that life should go a certain way. I develop an attachment to Plan A and set up my expectations accordingly. An important part of spiritual practice is to learn to let go, to recognize that Plan A exists only in my head. When I find myself irritated by change in my schedule or resisting whatever is happening around me, I tell myself, ‘We’re now in Plan B.’ In fact, it’s become a daily mantra: Life as Plan B. It makes it much easier for me to relax and surrender to the moment.” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“I’ve discovered that sending my children off with a ‘Have fun!’ gives me much more energy [rather than saying, ‘Be careful’], and it brings a smile to their faces. And in the end, I’d much rather have those words on my tombstone!” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“Everything is connected; everything changes; pay attention.” Jane Hirshfield


“Simple practices like conscious breathing and smiling are very important. They can change our civilization.” Thich Nhat Hanh, Peace is Every Step


“Mindfulness, which lies at the heart of Buddhist meditation, means moment-to-moment, non-judgmental awareness. It’s cultivated by refining our capacity to pay attention, intentionally, in the present moment, and then sustaining that attention over time. It means becoming more in touch with our life as it is unfolding.
Parenting through mindfulness has the potential to penetrate past surface appearances and behaviors and allow us to see our children as they truly are, so we can act with some degree of wisdom and compassion. The more we are able to keep in mind the intrinsic wholeness and beauty of our children – especially when it is difficult to see – the more our ability to be mindful deepens.” Jon Kabat-Zinn, in an interview with YES! Magazine


“The wonderful gift of mindfulness is that we can stop ourselves and ask: What am I feelings? What is it like from my child’s point of view? When you can do that, you often see things that you didn’t let yourself see before because you were so caught up in the reactive mode, which is very limiting.” Myla Kabat-Zinn, in an interview with YES! Magazine


“As mothers, our greatest gift to our family is our true presence . . . It is our being that makes all the difference.” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“Society conspires to disrespect the work of parenting in many ways. It’s totally socially acceptable to give 150 percent of your energy to work. It’s so misunderstood what the potential would be for a kind of wise attention given to children. It’s not smothering attention. It’s not neurotic attention. It’s not an overprotective attention. It’s the recognition of the relationship and the sacred quality of the parent/child relationship.” Jon Kabat-Zinn, in an interview with YES! Magazine


“There’s no formula for a perfect way to raise children, or that results in ‘perfect’ children, whatever that would mean. What we are saying is that our children are perfect just the way they are – including their imperfections. It’s important that we are authentic, and that we honor our children and ourselves as best we can, and that our intention be to, at the very least, do no harm. Mindful parenting is the hardest job on the planet, but it’s also one that has the potential for the deepest kinds of satisfactions over the life span, and the greatest feelings of interconnectedness and community and belonging.” Jon Kabat-Zinn, in an interview with YES! Magazine


“It’s interesting to look at your children as line-in Zen masters who can put their finger on places where you’re resistant, or thinking narrowly, in ways noone else can. You can either lose your mind and your authenticity in the process of reacting to all that stuff, or you can use it as the perfect opportunity to grow and nourish your children by attending to what is deepest and best in them and in yourself.” Jon Kabat-Zinn, in an interview with YES! Magazine


“What if you shifted your attitude just for a moment, and felt grateful that you live in the midst of this family, with all of its stickiness and disorder?” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“’What if I’m not a good enough mother? The house should stay clean. I should be more productive. People must treat me fairly. I won’t be able to handle this.’ All of these beliefs floating around my head sap my energy and are not at all useful.” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“…the challenge of being a parent is to live our moments as fully as possible, charting our own course as best we can, above all, nourishing our children, and in the process, growing ourselves.” Jon and Myla Kabat-Zinn, Everyday Blessings: The Inner Work of Mindful Parenting


“The way we talk to ourselves influences the way we parent. So often we don’t understand what our child is expressing because we’re caught up in our own thoughts or feelings . . . We see how we generate much of our own suffering through what we tell ourselves or through our desire to have things be different from how they are now . . . May we pay attention with kindness to what is happening within us and within our children.” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“…parenting is itself a calling. It calls us to recreate our world every day, to meet it freshly in every moment. Such a calling is nothing less than a rigorous spiritual discipline- a quest to realize our truest, deepest nature as a human being. The very fact that we are a parent is continually asking us to find and express what is most nourishing, most loving, most wise and caring in ourselves, to be, as much as we can, our best selves.” Jon and Myla Kabat-Zinn, Everyday Blessings: The Inner Work of Mindful Parenting


“’Perfect’ is simply not relevant, whatever that would mean in regard to parenting. What is important is that we be authentic, and that we honor our children and ourselves as best we can, and that our intention be to, at the very least, do no harm. To me, it feels like all the work is in the attending, in the quality of the attention I bring to each moment, and in my commitment to live and to parent as consciously as possible.” Jon and Myla Kabat-Zinn, Everyday Blessings: The Inner Work of Mindful Parenting


“Relationships are at the heart of everything. We are all connected.” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“Mindful parenting is hard work. It means knowing ourselves inwardly, and working at the interface where our inner lives meet the lives of our children. It is particularly hard work in this era, when the culture is intruding more and more into our homes and into our children’s lives in so many new ways.” Jon and Myla Kabat-Zinn, Everyday Blessings: The Inner Work of Mindful Parenting


“There are days when I feel like the worst mother in the world—days when I lose it, hardly recognizing myself as the nice person I once thought I was. It amazes me how quickly our buttons can get pushed, and negative energy can surge through us. Most of the time, this happens when old patterns emerge that have nothing to do with what’s actually happening with our children in the present moment. If we can create some space to understand what we’re feeling, we can ask ourselves what we need. It’s likely that we’re also feeling depleted in that moment—of sleep, food, energy, patience. Ask and listen: What do I need? What does my child need?” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“[To be mindful parents] we have to be whole ourselves, each his or her own person, with a life of our own, so that when [our children] look at us, they will be able to see our wholeness against the sky.” Jon and Myla Kabat-Zinn, Everyday Blessings: The Inner Work of Mindful Parenting


“We, like the Mother of the World, become the compassionate presence that can hold, with tenderness, the rising and passing waves of suffering.” Tara Brach, Radical Acceptance


“Parenting is above all uniquely personal. Ultimately, it has to come from deep inside ourselves.” Jon and Myla Kabat-Zinn, Everyday Blessings: The Inner Work of Mindful Parenting


“Women need solitude in order to find again the true essence of themselves: that firm strand which will be the indispensible center of a whole web of human relationships.” Anne Morrow Lindbergh


“Mindful parenting calls us to wake up to the possibilities, the benefits, and the challenges of parenting with a new awareness and intentionality, not only as if what we did mattered, but as if our conscious engagement in parenting were virtually the most important thing we could be doing, both for our children and for ourselves.” Jon and Myla Kabat-Zinn, Everyday Blessings: The Inner Work of Mindful Parenting


“We know how to sacrifice ten years for a diploma, and we are willing to work hard to get a job, a car, a house, and so on. But we have difficulty remembering that we are alive in the present moment, the only moment there is for us to be alive.” Thich Nhat Hanh, Peace is Every Step


“Mindfulness means moment-to-moment, nonjudgmental awareness. It is cultivated by refining our capacity to pay attention, intentionally, in the present moment, and then sustaining that attention over time as best we can. In the process, we become more in touch with life as it is unfolding.” Jon and Myla Kabat-Zinn, Everyday Blessings: The Inner Work of Mindful Parenting


“…our love for our children is expressed and experienced in the quality of the moment-to-moment relationships we have with them. It deepens in everyday moments when we hold those moments in awareness and dwell within them. Love is expressed in how we pass the bread, or how we say good morning, and not just in the big trip to Disney World. It is in the everyday kindnesses we show, the understanding we bring, and in the openness of our acceptance. Love is expressed by embodying love in our actions. Whether we are facing good times or hard times on any given day or in any given moment, the quality of our attention and our presence is a deep measure of our caring and of our love for our children.” Jon and Myla Kabat-Zinn, Everyday Blessings: The Inner Work of Mindful Parenting


“When you hold a child in your arms, or hug your mother, or your husband, or your friend, if you breathe in and out three times, your happiness will be multiplied at least tenfold.” Thich Nhat Hanh, The Heart of Understanding


“To be present . . . may be the hardest work in the world. And forget the “may be.” It is the hardest work in the world – at least to sustain presence.” Jon and Myla Kabat-Zinn, Everyday Blessings: The Inner Work of Mindful Parenting


“The funny thing is that if we bring awareness to what is in front of us every moment, without insisting on it being a certain way, then the discipline of doing just that gives rise to a stability of mind and an openness and clarity of heart that are unattainable by struggling to achieve them through forcing a particular resolution or outcome. For such harmony underlies everything. It is here now, in us, and in our children, if we but make room, over and over again for it to emerge.” Jon and Myla Kabat-Zinn, Everyday Blessings: The Inner Work of Mindful Parenting


“As we practice Momfulness [another word for conscious parenting], we develop the capacity to hold our own lives with a compassionate and loving heart. We learn to move closer to- even embrace- what is difficult rather than brace against or close off from painful feelings.” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“May our hearts open wide with compassion for ourselves, our children, and our world.” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“We see parenting as a sacred responsibility. Parents are nothing less than protectors, nourishers, comforters, teachers, guides, companions, models, and sources of unconditional love and acceptance. If we are able to keep this sense of parenting as a sacred responsibility in mind, and we bring a degree of mindfulness to the process as it unfolds moment to moment, our choices as parents are much more likely to come out of an awareness of what this moment, this child- at this stage of his or her life- is asking from us right now, through his very being and his behavior. In rising to this challenge, we may not only come to do what is best for our children’ we may also uncover and come to know, perhaps for the first time, what is deepest and best in ourselves.” Jon and Myla Kabat-Zinn, Everyday Blessings: The Inner Work of Mindful Parenting


“Remember: this life is not about perfection. It’s about practice – the practice of recognizing the grace that’s present in each moment. The grace is always there. We just need to create a little space, a little breathing room, to be aware of it to let it open us and soften our hearts.” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“Ask yourself ‘what is needed in this moment?’
See if you can find the grace in the chaos.
Then choose what you want to do next.”
Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“May I be filled with lovingkindness.
May I be well.
May I be peaceful and at ease.
May I be happy.”
Lovingkindness Meditation, from Jack Kornfield’s A Path With Heart


“Our own worst enemy cannot harm us as much as our unwise thoughts. No one can help us as much as our compassionate thoughts.” Jack Kornfield


Prayer of Caregiving
May the burden of caring
not feel so heavy
as I remember all who have
gone before me
and all who will come after me.
May I know myself to be part of a great dance
that circles and comes round again.
I give thanks for the privilege of caring.
I am home. I am home.
Jane Ellen Mauldin, Glory, Hallelujah! Now Please Pick Up Your Socks


“We can be like a mother to ourselves. We can take a breath and say to ourselves, ‘I know you suffer. I’m here for you.’ We can also send love to others who suffer in this way. By leaning into the difficult places rather than resisting them, and by holding the places of suffering, we discover our hearts softening and growing wider with compassion.” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“When we are listened to, it creates us, makes us unfold and expand.” Brenda Ueland, If You Want to Write


“When someone deeply listens to you, your barefeet are on the earth, and a beloved land that seemed distant, is now at home within you.” John Fox


“When we listen deeply – to our children, our partner, our friends, to strangers, even to ourselves- it is … as if gold has been discovered. We help release in each other more of who we really are.” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“The real meditative practice is to open up to the full range of what happens in life. And parenting is a fantastic arena for doing that kind of spiritual training. It’s as much a potential door into enlightenment as anything else.” Jon Kabat-Zinn, in an interview with YES! Magazine


“We all have these moments when we explode, when we say or do things that we wish we never had. I’m not excusing them. But it’s in these moments that we can learn forgiveness and compassion toward ourselves and those we love. This is our practice, and it’s an incredibly challenging and profound one. It’s only when we’re willing to transform ourselves, bit by bit, that our world is transformed.” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“When people are blessed they discover that their lives matter, that there is something in them worthy of blessing.” Rachel Naomi Remen, My Grandfather’s Blessings


“It’s also helpful to realize that this body that we have, this very body that’s sitting here right now in this room, this very body that perhaps aches, and this mind that we have at this very moment, are exactly what we need to be fully human, fully awake, fully alive.” Pema Chodron, The Wisdom of No Escape


“Over the years I have struggled, as many women do, with body image. Actually, the experience of being a mother—of pregnancy as well as nursing, bathing, tending, touching, holding bodies—has shown me how sacred and powerful my body is. I have been in awe of what it knows how to do.” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


If God said,
“Rumi, pay homage to everything
that has helped you
enter my arms,”
there would not be one experience of my life,
not one thought, not one feeling,
not any act, I
would not
bow to.
Rumi (in Love Poems from God, Daniel Ladinsky, trans.)


“Motherhood shifts our ideas about holiness. We don’t need to return to an earlier age of miracles; we simply need to see what is in our own lives through new eyes. We discover the sacred residing not only in cathedrals but also in carpool lanes. We witness the Divine peeking through moments of silliness as well as silence, as we sense love’s presence in our bodies as well as in our spirits.


As we practice Momfulness, we celebrate the holy in the ordinary. We build in ‘sacred pauses,’ creating rituals and traditions that help wake us up to the extraordinary moments of love and grace that wind through our everyday lives.” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“Sitting around the table telling stories is not just a way of passing time. It is the way the wisdom gets passed along.” Rachel Naomi Remen, Kitchen Table Wisdom


“Stories weave families together. Birth stories, silly stories, life-and-death stories, Uncle Joe stories, sacred stories. Over and over, we tell them. We pass them on from generation to generation. In good times, in hard times, this is how we were together. This is how we made it through. This is how we lived and laughed and loved.” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“As a way of cultivating our practice of Momfulness and of enhancing our ability to sense the sacred in our lives, we can bracket each day with a frame of intention and gratitude: We begin the day with a morning offering or setting of intention and end with an evening prayer or meditation of gratitude.” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“Can you envision that brief moment between sleep and wakefulness? What if you just stayed in place for a moment or two? When you wake up tomorrow morning, let your plans wait another few minutes. Take a moment to notice the tiny opening into the new day before your busy mind takes over. Breathe in and breathe out. Welcome the day. Be aware of your body. Settle into it. Smile. The door of this new day is opening.” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“Spirituality is the sacred center out of which all life comes, including Mondays and Tuesdays and rainy Saturday afternoons in all their mundane and glorious detail. . . . The spiritual journey is the soul’s life commingling with ordinary life.” Christina Baldwin, Life’s Companion


“When we celebrate moments together, from family dinners to bedtime rituals to holiday celebrations, we strengthen our families. We create lasting memories, we give our children a sense of security, we share our spirituality with our children, and we deepen a sense of belonging. . . .But in modern-day life, with families often separated from relatives or no longer connected with their childhood faith traditions, new rituals and traditions may need to be established. Mothers are often the primary ritual makers in families, and it’s so important that we take the time to create these ‘sacred pauses’ in our otherwise busy days. . . So light a candle, sing a song, say grace before meals. Slow down and recognize the connection and the celebration, the mystery and the miracle, that are present in our everyday lives.” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“I do not at all understand the mystery of grace—only that it meets us where we are but does not leave us where it found us.” Anne Lamott, Traveling Mercies


“Grace is there when you haven’t got a clue, when you feel like the worst mother in the world, and when being a mom is so much harder than you ever thought it would be. It applies the gentle push on your back that keeps you going. . . Grace is there, even when you’re not mindful or compassionate, when you’re not present or forgiving; it waits patiently for you to let go into it. Grace comes through the support of friends; it reassures you with their smiles, with their understanding nods of Yes, I understand, I know it is so hard! Grace holds you up when you feel completely unappreciated because no one sees all the thousands of little things you do in a day. Grace sees. . . Grace winds through your life invisibly, though you often can’t see it until you look back and recognize it in your children’s growing bodies, in their quick wit, their caring comments, their embracing hugs. . . Grace reveals to you a great mothering love that you can step into, that’s been here before you and will be here after you. Grace will be with you as you open your arms, as you release your children and send them out into the world. If you listen carefully, you can hear grace whispering its thanks to you for being a mother to these souls.” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“I don’t know what I would do in the world without [female friends] for advice, for comfort, for simply knowing that there is someone out there who knows me as I am, and loves me despite and because of it.” Anna Quindlen (“Some of my best friends are women,” The Houston Chronicle)


“In addition to small circles of support, it’s so essential that we, as a society, find ways to support mothers and families. So many mothers today are stretched to the point of breaking, and the result is that everyone suffers. The health and well-being of our entire community will be enhanced when we do a better job honoring the role of raising children, when we give parents paid family leave, flexible work hours, a living wage, excellent and affordable child care, and health care for all children. Through doing these things, we create a sacred circle, collectively caring for the next generation.” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“My hope for our children’s children is that they will have more support from their culture and from one another for slowing down, attending inwardly, and living in ways that help sustain life on earth. The work each of us does to slow our pace and draw from the Deep River [within] is part of creating that life-sustaining future.” Abby Seixas, Finding the Deep River Within: A Woman’s Guide to Recovering Balance & Meaning in Everyday Life


“We have many mothers—people who have come along and loved us into wholeness. Their acts of kindness, their willingness to see us, to be there for us, to support us in ways that perhaps our own mothers couldn’t, are all ways that they have mothered us.” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“It is in the shelter of each other that people live.” Irish Proverb


“The problem with the world is that we draw the circle of our family too small.” Mother Teresa


“When I am willing to cross the line of how much I think I can love, I am changed. When I am more in touch with what I love than what I fear, I take a stand. My prayer is that more and more of us, on behalf of all children, will use the energy of a mother to touch the seeds of courage and love within us for the sake of the world.” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“…ultimately each child is unique and each situation is different. We have to rely on our hearts, our deepest human instincts, and the things we carry from our own childhood, both positive and negative, to encounter the unknown territory of having and raising children.” Jon and Myla Kabat-Zinn, Everyday Blessings: The Inner Work of Mindful Parenting


“[W]e are one community, one earth, and we will be well only if we care for each other and for the earth.” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“Our part is to begin the work with our children. In the end, that’s all we can do. Then we must let go, say a prayer, and trust the universe—and all the angels—to hold them” Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“For me, mindfulness- cultivated in periods of stillness and during the day in various things I find myself doing- hones an attentive sensitivity to the present moment that helps me keep my heart at least a tiny bit more open and my mind at least a tiny bit clear, so that I have a chance to see my children for who they are, to remember to give them what they most need from me, and to make plenty of room for them to find their own ways to be in the world.” Jon and Myla Kabat-Zinn, Everyday Blessings: The Inner Work of Mindful Parenting


May we be fully present, here and now, aware of the gift of each moment.
May we pay attention with kindness to what is happening within us and within our children.
May our hearts open wide with compassion for ourselves, our children, and our world.
May we live fully in our bodies as we bless our families each day.
May we open to the great love and grace that holds us all.
May we care for each other and for the earth as we draw wide the circle of our family.
May we all find peace.
May we all be well.
Denise Roy, MOMfulness: Mothering with Mindfulness, Compassion, and Grace


“Someone said to me once- ‘Happiness grows in direct proportion to your acceptance, and in inverse proportion to your expectations.” Michael J. Fox


“If I’m sitting and watching t.v. or something and my kids come up to me and want to show me something, I just made up my mind that there’s nothing I’m doing at any time that’s more important than that. And I’ll always get up every time and go. And I don’t know that I would think that way before [getting Parkinson’s disease]. I just get that every moment is special and important.” Michael J. Fox


“The purpose of time-in is to find the firm strand [within us]. We need to pull away from the roles, relationships, and activities that ordinarily define us and enter into solitude in order to find our true essence and come more directly into relationship with ourselves rather than defining ourselves primarily through our roles as partners, spouses, coworkers, mothers, sisters, friends, and so on.” Abby Seixas, Finding the Deep River Within: A Woman’s Guide to Recovering Balance & Meaning in Everyday Life


“What’s important is to ask yourself the question,’ What will it take for me to replenish myself?’ And to listen to the answer.” Abby Seixas, Finding the Deep River Within: A Woman’s Guide to Recovering Balance & Meaning in Everyday Life


“Find your space. Find your spot. Wear what you love. Choose the careers that may have meaning to you, because there’s always somebody who will say, ‘I wouldn’t have worn that color,’ or ‘Why didn’t you do that job?’ But if you’re comfortable in the choice and it resonates with you, then all that other stuff – it’s just a conversation. People have the right to have conversations. But I think that’s one thing we as women sometimes do—we don’t make choices that have meaning to us. And then when those things fall apart, you have to have yourself to fall back on.” Michelle Obama, in an interview with Time Magazine